Forthcoming Civic Society Spring/Summer Events.

ALL FREE AND GOOD FUN
31st May – NEWPORT CANAL STROLL – Guided by John Myers from the Canal Trust we shall learn a little of the history of the canal + recent developments. This will be followed by a visit to the Bridge Inn to take refreshments.
MEET 7.30PM AT THE BLACK SHED OPPOSITE COSY HALL

28th June – HIGH STREET HISTORY STROLL – Guided by Linda Fletcher from the Newport History Society we will discover some of the highlights of our wonderful town + some tales of its darker past followed by refreshments !
MEET 7.30PM OUTSIDE THE GUILDHALL.

26th July – LILLESHALL NATIONAL SPORTS CENTRE STROLL – After extensive refurbishment to the Centre over the last few years we shall have the opportunity to have a look at the Hall and a glimpse at some of the wonderful facilities offered to our world-class athletes. For those that are feeling more energetic they will have the opportunity to stroll round the Formal Gardens before taking refreshment in the bar !
No surprise there then.
MEET 7.30PM UNDER THE ARCH AT THE NATIONAL SPORTS CENTRE

TWC/2022/0335-SOCIETY PUBLIC HOUSE, NEWPORT, OLD MARKET HALL, STAFFORD STREET -Application to extend opening hours.

Copy the details in the link below into your search engine:-

https://secure.telford.gov.uk/planning/pa-documents-documents-public.aspx?ApplicationNumber=TWC/2022/0335

TWC/2022/0346- NATIONWIDE BUILDING SOCIETY – Repairs and painting to window surrounds & other exterior renovation works.

Copy the details in the link below into your search engine:-

https://secure.telford.gov.uk/planning/pa-documents-public.aspx?Applicationnumber=TWC/2022/0346

FREE talk on “Newport Matters – or does it?”

“NEWPORT MATTERS – OR DOES IT ?”

5th May 7.45pm – Newport Cricket Club – Free

Short presentation on – HOUSING GROWTH IN NEWPORT; NEWPORT’S NEW INDUSTRIAL PARK ; DEVELOPERS £ FOR NEWPORT ; TandW £ FOR NEWPORT TOWN CENTRE ; CAR PARKING IN NEWPORT ; HOW HEALTHY IS NEWPORT TOWN CENTRE?
Our aim is to 1. Inform you about the above
2. Provide opportunities to stay informed
3.Provide opportunities to maintain and improve the “Quality of Life” in Newport

Newport Town Council – Annual Town Meeting 6th April 2022.

NOTICE IS GIVEN
NEWPORT (Shropshire) TOWN COUNCIL
will hold its
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING

The meeting will be held at

The Parish Rooms, NEW STREET, NEWPORT
7.00 p.m. on
Wednesday 6th April 2022

All electors of Newport are invited & encouraged to attend this meeting A representative from West Mercia Police will give a presentation on the work of the Local Safer Neighbourhood Team.

Followed by a Residents Discussion – on matters that affect residents and the town directly Town Council’s Annual “Special Recognition Award” will be announced and presented following the meeting

All electors of Newport are invited & encouraged to attend this meeting.

Town Clerk – Sheila Atkinson March 2022

Campaign comes to an end. Letter sent to the Shropshire Star and Newport Advertiser.

The final approval given to build on the green field site to the west of Station Road (Shropshire Star, 29/1/22, ‘Plans for more than 300 homes to be built on Newport field get green light’) marks the end of an 11 year fight by the (Tried To) Save Newport from the Developers Campaign, a group of local people and organisations, who had sought to retain this last remaining and much valued area of open space between Newport and Church Aston.
Having prevented the building of a giant Sainsbury’s superstore on the Council owned land, then failing to have the site formally designated as a Village Green, the campaign group lobbied to retain the area as open space through the development of the Council’s Local Plan. This may have been successful had the Council not by-passed the Inquiry Inspector’s proposed modifications to the Draft Plan by submitting, and then approving, a planning application on land in their ownership.
Whilst the Bloor Homes scheme is a vast improvement on the previous development proposals for the site, this should not take away from the fact that there is no identified need to be building this major urban extension to the south of Newport. According to the Council’s own latest Housing Land Supply Statement, sufficient housing sites have already been identified to meet the assessed need for the next 6 years, a period during which the Council’s Local Plan is due to be reviewed and rolled forward. The developer’s statement that around 12 acres of usable green space, including a series of green corridors through the site creating new recreational and leisure opportunities and a community orchard, will somehow provide better open space and compensate for the loss of 35 acres of Grade 2 agricultural land, I would suggest is somewhat debatable.
Work has now started to prepare the site for development, with hedge and tree cutting prior to the bird nesting season. A number of issues, however, still remain unresolved. There is still no approved surface water drainage scheme, the extent of the loss of hedgerow along the A518 has still to be determined, and the capacity of the local primary and secondary schools to accommodate the required additional pupil places has been thrown into question.
Newport and its environs have seen the development of 1,300 houses, including those currently under construction, over the past 10 years, resulting in an estimated population increase of some 3,000 people, representing a 25% increase since the 2011 Census. Over the same period Telford is estimated to have grown by 10%. Telford is a designated growth area with infrastructural capacity, Newport is not. Funding to be made available by the developer through Section 106 planning obligations will not be sufficient to redress Newport’s lack of the necessary physical, social and environmental infrastructure to accommodate the impact of a further 300 houses.
This development could finally provide a tipping point and result in a marked reduction in the quality of life for local residents. This is reflected in the community consultation feedback undertaken by Bloor Homes consultants, with two thirds of respondents indicating that ‘there was not a need for new high quality homes in Newport’.
Of course, this will not be the last housing site to be developed to the south of Newport, with the land to the east of Station Rd about to be sold with outline planning approval for a further 200 houses.
John Pay Church Aston

Royal Victoria Mansions (formerly Royal Victoria Hotel) – For Sale.

Details in the link below. Paste into your search engine:

http://www.andrew-dixon.co.uk/propertyInfo.asp?id=779-5

Society News

The Society is considering offering to host a meeting of representatives from other local groups and voluntary bodies to see if any common issues which relate to the town and its future would benefit from being addressed by representatives and/or volunteers from other local groups/voluntary bodies. The meeting would be held at a date yet to be fixed towards the end of January 2022.

The Blue Diamond Group acquires Mere Park Garden Centre.

The Blue Diamond Group announce the 38th Garden Centre acquisition, Mere Park Garden Centre in Newport, Shropshire.

Blue Diamond managing director Alan Roper said: “Mere Park Garden Centre has excellent A1 retail planning permission and is a quality freehold asset. The site has strong potential and Newport has a strong AB1 demographic.”

David Brierley, the former owner of the garden centre said: “I am delighted to have sold Mere Park to the leading garden centre operator in the UK and look forward to watching the business thrive as part of the Blue Diamond Group.”

Details about the Blue Diamond Group can be found in the link below:-

https://www.bluediamond.gg/news/article/blue-diamond-group-acquires-mere-park-garden-centre

Plans for former Newport hotel to be converted into 17 apartments approved.

Extract from report by Charlotte Bentley Shropshire Star.

Telford and Wrekin Council has approved plans for the former Royal Victoria hotel on St Mary’s Street, Newport to be converted into accommodation.

Back in 2018, full planning permission and listed building consent was granted for the “demolition of rear extension and the internal floors for the conversion of the hotel into 12 no. apartments.

The application’s design and access statement said: “All conditions on these consents have been discharged and the applicant is therefore in a position to implement the approved scheme.
There will be no further demolitions compared to the original permitted scheme other than the gable wall where a Structural Engineers Report has confirmed this wall as being unsafe. The removal of the existing roof and the interior had already been permitted in the 2018 consent and no other structural changes or removal of historic fabric are proposed.”

A conservation officer said the main significance of the former hotel was it’s historical aspects and the surviving architecture of its frontage.

Their report read: “Generally speaking, the architectural merit lies mainly within its principal elevation which fronts St. Mary’s Street and has the biggest visual impact on the street scene. Therefore, the retention of the façade and in addition the basement (currently not utilised) and lobby are supported.”

The design and access statement also confirmed that a total of seven parking spaces already provided is “considered to be suitable in view of the town centre location of the site and the availability of on-street parking and other sustainable modes of transport.”